Tomb found under Roman Forum may be the final resting place of Romulus 

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Have archaeologists found the burial place of Rome’s founder? Tomb found under the city’s Forum may be the final resting place of Romulus

  • Tomb discovered under the Roman Forum could be the resting place of Romulus
  • Archaeologists uncovered an area devoted to Romulus dating to 6th century BC
  • The underground temple is buried beneath the entrance stairway to the Curia

A tomb discovered under the Roman Forum could be the resting place of the city’s legendary founder Romulus.     

Archaeologists are believed to have uncovered an area devoted to the first King of Rome and a rock sarcophagus, measuring 4.6ft, which are believed to date back to the 6th century BC. 

Director of the Colosseum Archaeological Park Alfonsina Russo told The Times: ‘This is an extraordinary discovery. The forum never ceases to yield amazing fresh treasures.’ 

Tomb discovered under the Roman Forum (pictured) could be the resting place of the city's legendary founder Romulus

Tomb discovered under the Roman Forum (pictured) could be the resting place of the city’s legendary founder Romulus

What is the Roman Forum?  

The Roman Forum, known as the Forum Romanum in Latin, was the heartbeat of both Ancient Rome and its continent-straddling empire. 

Historians believe people first began meeting in the Forum in 500BC when the Roman Republic was founded. 

The area is situated between  Palatine Hill and Capitoline Hill. 

The Temple of Julius Caesar is the most striking monument and was built a couple of years after Ancient Rome’s most famous leader was murdered in 44BC.

The underground temple is buried beneath the entrance stairway to the Curia and was the place where Roman senators voted with every presumed to belong to one. 

Scholars believed, according to Ms Russo, that the temple’s altar has been positioned where ancient Romans believed Romulus was buried. Yet no bones were found in the coffin.  

The finding had taken place near the Lapis Niger, an ancient black shrine in the Roman Forum, according to Andreas Steiner, editor of the magazine Archeo.  

The shrine, discovered in 1899, has a Greek inscription referring to how the sacred ground must not be disturbed. 

In Roman mythology, Romulus and his twin brother Remus were left in a basket on the River Tiber. 

The pair survived and were discovered under a fig tree and a she-wolf suckled them. 

Romulus later killed his brother Remus in a fight on what became Palatine Hill in 753BC. 

The pair survived and were discovered under a fig tree and a she-wolf suckled them Pictured: The Capitoline Wolf statue in Rome

The pair survived and were discovered under a fig tree and a she-wolf suckled them Pictured: The Capitoline Wolf statue in Rome

WHO WAS ROMULUS?  

In Roman mythology, Romulus and his twin brother Remus were left in a basket on the River Tiber.

In legend, they were the sons of Rhea Silvia, the daughter of Numitor, the former king of Alba Longa.

Through this lineage, the twins were descended from the Trojan hero Aeneas and Latinus.

A she-wolf found the twins at the the base of a fig tree after their mother was forced to abandon them. 

The wolf cared for the boys and raised them. letting them suckle on her. 

They learned of their true ancestry as they grew up and overthrew Amulius, the man who forced them to be abandoned. 

The two brothers set out to build their own city but cold not agree on where. An ensuing melee resulted in the death of his brother Remus.  

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